I Am Mary Dunne

I Am Mary Dunne A beautitul woman in her early thirties Mary Lavery nee Dunne lives in New York and is happily married to a much feted British playing playwright But before this there have been other lives two pre

  • Title: I Am Mary Dunne
  • Author: Brian Moore
  • ISBN: 9780099102212
  • Page: 292
  • Format: None
  • A beautitul woman in her early thirties, Mary Lavery, nee Dunne lives in New York and is happily married to a much feted British playing playwright But before this there have been other lives, two previous husbands, and a Catholic girlhood filled with suppressed passion A brief encounter with an old friend brings back a sudden flood of memories from the past memories wA beautitul woman in her early thirties, Mary Lavery, nee Dunne lives in New York and is happily married to a much feted British playing playwright But before this there have been other lives, two previous husbands, and a Catholic girlhood filled with suppressed passion A brief encounter with an old friend brings back a sudden flood of memories from the past memories which confuse and disturb Female desire and sexuality, and the elusive nature of identity are brilliantly explored in this novel which glimmers with insight and truth.

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      Posted by:Brian Moore
      Published :2019-08-14T09:56:02+00:00

    1 thought on “I Am Mary Dunne”

    1. (view spoiler)[ Bettie's BooksThe rating, any status updates, and those bookshelves, indicate my feelings for this book. (hide spoiler)]

    2. I read this book when I was very young, either teen or early twenties. I found Mary's identity problems because of the different last names she had had infantile and her PMS problems contrived. Clearly the author was a male. It's impressive that I remember being annoyed after almost 20 years. This book portrayed a woman that was everything I did not want to be. And after several husbands I can with confidence say I never had any identity issues for that reason. My last name does not define me. I [...]

    3. Probably more of a 3.5 star than 3 star for me. This is the fifth or sixth novel of Moore's that I've read, but the first that isn't set in N Ireland. Published in 1968, the book is a first person narrative told by Mary Lavery, a 32 year old Canadian living in New York with her third husband Terence, a successful British playwright. While the 'present' consists of a single day, during which Mary constantly refers to her 'evil twin' (PMT issues), a series of encounters-a hairdressing appointment, [...]

    4. I am Mary Dunne covers a single day in the life of Mary Lavery, née Dunne, ex-Mary Bell, ex-Mary Phelan. She's currently married to her third husband but can't help remembering events from the past even though she has trouble with her memory. Brian Moore is a new favourite author of mine but I was a little wary of this one at the beginning as he adopts a first-person narrative where we are dropped straight in to the confusion that is Mary's life; but Moore handles it really well and although it [...]

    5. All literary affairs - like all love in general, I suppose - happen at different speeds. Sarah Vowell hit me like a ton of bricks, but Brian Moore came up quietly beside me, gently poking me in the ribs each time I walked into a book store. "Remember Brian Moore?" he says. "Remember how much you liked the last book?" I Am Mary Dunne, written in 1968, is the sixth novel by Mr. Moore that I've read and I'm sorry to say that it's taken this long for me to realize that he and I are definitely having [...]

    6. I loved this book when I read it. It said so much about the experience of being human. If you have ever looked back to examine your own past and the type of person you used to be then you will love this book too. Reading this I understood the effect of the passage of time on myself - as L.P Hartley famously wrote, "The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there," this book shows that our own past is populated by different versions of ourselves and is a foreign country to us now. [...]

    7. The main character has more than PMS. I beleive it crossed the line into premenstural phycosis I felt almost as strung out as she when I finished the book. The central theme appeared to be identity crises, but mental illness was always lurking about waiting to engulf Mary. I found Moore's view of women often times seemed very stilted. Not a good read. It left me feeling almost a neurotic as the heroine ick!

    8. I really couldn't get into this book. Mary Dunne seems to be floundering in New York, working on her third marriage and can't get a grip on her life. She seems to have three personalities inhabiting her body who are at war with each other. It got tedious after a while trying to keep track of them

    9. I'm getting close to the end of the book and find that I am enjoying it. It reminds me of Diary of a Mad Housewife that I had to read for a women's fiction class back in college (1976). I agree that her issues are more than PMS and the thought "Of course, this is written by a man" does keep flitting in and out of my head while reading.

    10. Another very well written book from Brian Moore. He has the knack of injecting real pace and tension into a seemingly simple and slow-moving tale.Not qualified to say how good this is as the portrait of what goes on inside a woman, never having understood that myself, but it convinced me!

    11. I read this in the late 90s. I think it fit into the time of its publication when people were divorcing/remarrying (which still happens of course) but was rather new to the American consciousness in the 70s. A woman one day in the hair salon forgets her name when asked -- she's been married 2 or 3 times and suddenly begins to question her entire identity, life and life choices.

    12. I'm not normally one for introspectively-written character pieces, especially of women written by men, but Moore does a wonderful job with Dunne. My masters thesis was on this and the final chapter of Joyce's Ulysses on Molly Bloom.

    13. Loved this - it really gets inside the mind of a very specific kind of woman. And why she is the way she is. Written more than 40 years ago, it doesn't feel dated. Highly recommended.

    14. Mind crushing: a perfect depiction of mania and paranoia. Only read if feeling emotionally robust. Having said all that, totally brilliant.

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