Nothing Is Hidden: The Psychology of Zen Koans

Nothing Is Hidden The Psychology of Zen Koans In this inspiring and incisive offering Barry Magid uses the language of modern psychology and psychotherapy to illuminate one of Buddhism s most powerful and often mysterious technologies the Zen ko

  • Title: Nothing Is Hidden: The Psychology of Zen Koans
  • Author: Barry Magid
  • ISBN: 9781614290827
  • Page: 252
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this inspiring and incisive offering, Barry Magid uses the language of modern psychology and psychotherapy to illuminate one of Buddhism s most powerful and often mysterious technologies the Zen koan What s , Magid also uses the koans to expand upon the insights of psychology especially self psychology and relational psychotherapy and open for the reader new perIn this inspiring and incisive offering, Barry Magid uses the language of modern psychology and psychotherapy to illuminate one of Buddhism s most powerful and often mysterious technologies the Zen koan What s , Magid also uses the koans to expand upon the insights of psychology especially self psychology and relational psychotherapy and open for the reader new perspectives on the functioning of the human mind and heart Nothing Is Hidden explores many rich themes, including facing impermanence and the inevitability of change, working skillfully with desire and attachment, and discovering when surrender and submission can be liberating and when they shade into emotional bypassing With a sophisticated view of the rituals and teachings of traditional Buddhism, Magid helps us see how we sometimes subvert meditation into just another curative fantasy or make compassion into a form of masochism.

    • Best Download [Barry Magid] ☆ Nothing Is Hidden: The Psychology of Zen Koans || [Suspense Book] PDF Õ
      252 Barry Magid
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Barry Magid] ☆ Nothing Is Hidden: The Psychology of Zen Koans || [Suspense Book] PDF Õ
      Posted by:Barry Magid
      Published :2019-03-22T06:23:50+00:00

    1 thought on “Nothing Is Hidden: The Psychology of Zen Koans”

    1. I wonder why there are no bad books on Buddhism, or Zen, or even “mindfulness” for that matter. Has anyone else noticed that? It seems quite common to see complaints about a novelist’s work, or even that of poets. Their attempts at creativity can receive crushing reviews. I have even seen works rejected due to the author’s use of commas. But, somehow, no books on Zen and Buddhism seem to receive this treatment? This is strange. Why does this happen? My two cents worth: People like comfor [...]

    2. This was the first book that I won for a First Reads giveaway! I entered the giveaway knowing that I am a beginner when it comes to zen teachings, but having some experience with psychology having studied it in school. I was thus worried that it would go a bit over my head, but hoped that my knowledge base would make up for it. I was both right and wrong. This book proclaims itself to be about the psychology of the zen koans, but it read more like a history of them, along with a deep contemplati [...]

    3. A fascinating read that reaches great insights at times; and then other times seems like a foray into psychoanalysis that was less interesting to me.The book is a little misleading in that it really isn't about koans. Don't turn to this book if you're looking into insight into how to study koans. Each chapter begins with a short koan which is really just an excuse for the author to share his thoughts derived from years of Zen and psychoanalytic practice.Great stuff here. . . really worth stickin [...]

    4. A look at how Zen koans can be used in conjunction with psychological practice. He brings up a lot of good, honest points about issues in both Zen and psychological practice, as well as Zen communities. Best when he's speaking more generally; worst in the parts where he gets a bit mired in psychoanalyst speak (since he is a psychoanalyst as well as a Zen teacher) and becomes less accessible.

    5. Rather than revealing how koans WORK on a psychological level (what I hoped to read), this book looks at koan after koan and finds each lacking (in theory or practice) without the added tools of psychotherapy. At one point, it seems to imply that only a genius at enlightenment, like the Dalai Lama, can forego psychotherapy without harm. Note: I am not a psychotherapy hater.

    6. A wonderful guide through various life-altering koans. Read with notepad handy!For full review go to: 108zenbooks/2013/10/13/bre

    7. Some really wonderful insights into the ways koan study and psychoanalysis complement each other, but heavy handed at the end in terms of what Magid sees as the "correct" way of doing things.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *