The Earth After Us: What Legacy Will Humans Leave in the Rocks?

The Earth After Us What Legacy Will Humans Leave in the Rocks Geologist Jan Zalasiewicz takes the reader on a fascinating trip one hundred million years into the future long after the human race becomes extinct to explore what will remain of our brief but dramat

  • Title: The Earth After Us: What Legacy Will Humans Leave in the Rocks?
  • Author: Jan Zalasiewicz
  • ISBN: 9780199214976
  • Page: 457
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Geologist Jan Zalasiewicz takes the reader on a fascinating trip one hundred million years into the future long after the human race becomes extinct to explore what will remain of our brief but dramatic sojourn on Earth He describes how geologists in the far future might piece together the history of the planet, and slowly decipher the history of humanity from the traceGeologist Jan Zalasiewicz takes the reader on a fascinating trip one hundred million years into the future long after the human race becomes extinct to explore what will remain of our brief but dramatic sojourn on Earth He describes how geologists in the far future might piece together the history of the planet, and slowly decipher the history of humanity from the traces we will leave impressed in the rock strata What story will the rocks tell of us What kind of fossils will humans leave behind What will happen to cities, cars, and plastic cups The trail leads finally to the bones of the inhabitants of petrified cities that have slept deep underground for many millions of years As thought provoking as it is engaging, this book simultaneously explains the geological mechanisms that shape our planet, from fossilization to plate tectonics, illuminates the various ingenious ways in which geologists and paleontologist work, and offers a final perspective on humanity and its actions that may prove to be objective than any other.

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      Published :2019-02-17T04:18:27+00:00

    1 thought on “The Earth After Us: What Legacy Will Humans Leave in the Rocks?”

    1. Look back a hundred million years to the mid-Cretaceous period: how accurate a picture of that world do we have today? Well, we know quite a bit about its marine life (shallow seas, which were widespread then, are by far the best environments for the preservation of fossils), but our knowledge of the deep oceans and of life on land is a lot more patchy. Take dinosaurs as a good example: we know a decent amount about lowland species, but comparatively nothing about those of the uplands and mounta [...]

    2. This starts off as being just an explanation of how geology works — deposition over time, the way rocks are transformed and eroded, etc, etc. The last couple of chapters start getting into the stuff I’m really interested in: how material remains of humans might weather and last, to be found for potential future alien archaeologists. I didn’t really love Zalasiewicz’s attempts at sci-fi, with his commentary on these alien archaeologists/anthropologists and what they might think. Like most [...]

    3. This book reinforced two ideas that I should have accepted by now: I know more than the average bear about geology,and books should never, never be written entirely in a sans-serif font.I've been working with earth scientists for ten years, so it would make sense that I know something about the topic. And as an undergrad in Advertising, I had to study typefaces. So both of these ideas should have sunk in by now. I'm glad Zalasiewicz proved them right.I was especially interested in reading this b [...]

    4. Was really looking forward to this, but the title and description are pretty misleading. It's really just a lecture on how geology works, and why so few things get preserved as fossils. It's not until Chapter 8 (out of 10!) that he finally gets into "OK, so what will humans have left behind in 10,000 years?) And that part is interesting--why New Orleans is more likely to be preserved than Denver, for instance. But it doesn't go far enough (I was hoping he'd cover something like the Waste Isolati [...]

    5. Jan Zalasiewicz grabbed me as soon as he described strata as the archives of earth's geological history. I learned more about earth science in this elegant little book than I imagined possible. I actually grasp concepts like turbidity and geological formations like turbite fans, specialties like sequence stratigraphy, and the elegance of plate tectonics. Occasionally, I glanced through a window into deep time. What will the Urban Strata reveal of us 100 million years hence? Read this wonderful b [...]

    6. This book was just all over the place. The author uses the premise of alien explorers 100 million years into the future visiting Earth to explain to the lay reader the principles of geology while also sneaking in an environmental message. This results in a book that is almost built on digressions. One moment the author is discussing plate tectonics, next, he is giving an extremely thorough example of the animal life in a particular strata and then he manages to insert an environmental message as [...]

    7. An interesting idea badly executed. The author forgets his audience is likely to be the interested amateur.

    8. I was curious of reading this book after having discovered the author in a blog. Jan Zalasiewicz is a British geologist author of The Planet in a Pebble and the present book The Earth After Us. Jan Zalasiewicz imagines a far-future without humans. For that matter, he explores the past of the earth to understand what legacy ancient species left in the rocks — fossils — and the reason of their extinction — climate change, activities of ancient species, and the geological mutation of the eart [...]

    9. When I borrowed this book from the library, I thought I was getting another "how soon will it take buildings to be replaced with rainforest if mankind were to vanish". There is a book about that, with a similar title, but this is not that book. This book is nominally "what fossils and other geological evidence would we leave for future paleontologists, a million years hence?"I say "nominally", because it's really only that in the last three or four chapters. Until then it's a fascinating introdu [...]

    10. Themen: Geologie, Paläontologie, Erdgeschichte, Zukunft.In Die Erde nach Uns geht Jan Zalasiewicz der Frage auf den Grund, was vom Menschen fossil erhalten werden kann, wenn er stirbt. Dazu lässt er in 100 Millionen Jahren außerirdische Besucher auf die Erde kommen, die unseren Planten untersuchen. Dies ist der Science Fiction Anteil an diesem Buch. In der ersten Hälfte erklärt Zalasiewicz relativ ausführlich die Grundlagen der geologischen Wissenschaft: Plattentektonik, Fossilisation, Kli [...]

    11. Perhaps reflecting the current global issues that cause us to contemplate our mortality and vulnerability as a species, there are several books around (Year Million, The World Without Us) that focus on the post-human earth. However, this one is written by a geologist (which, of course, I see as a good thing).To geologists, the fact that this account is a humbling one will come as no surprise, but the poverty of our legacy, thoroughly thought through and documented in the book, is, nevertheless, [...]

    12. If humans become extinct (or perhaps more accurately, ‘when’ they become extinct) what evidence would be preserved in the Earth’s geologic strata 100 million years in the future? This is the question Jan Zalasiewicz loosely examines in The Earth After Us: What Legacy Will Humans Leave in the Rocks? Although this is a similar premise to Alan Weisman’s book The World Without Us, Zalasiewicz approaches the topic from a geological and paleontological point of view.While the premise is modera [...]

    13. This book is somewhat similar to The World Without Us although it takes a much longer view. It imagines an alien race discovering and exploring the earth 100 million years in the future, long after the human species has become extinct. The text offers a good primer on geology as the author shows how the alien explorers would discover the inner workings of the planet: strata formation, plate tectonics, mountain formation and erosion, and the formation of fossils. The central question of the book [...]

    14. This was a pretty interesting and informative read. Much was over my head as I am not a geologist and haven't heard some of this material in quite a while, but interesting nonetheless. This book was not what I was expecting. I was thinking it would be more along the lines of Alan Weissman's book "The World Without Us", but it was a rather different approach on the subject. This book focused mostly about what kinds of fossil remains we as a species would leave behind. A good 75% of the book is ju [...]

    15. I think that there are very few accessible books in the realm of geology that would be of much interest to most people. This book has a lot of interesting implications for a wide audience. The writing is decent at best, but the content is really well organized and very interesting. The book seeks to answer the question of what kind of geological footprint humans are leaving on the earth. I think this is a good subject that deserves a bit of attention and I enjoyed the read.

    16. Well-written, scientific piece that is easily accessible by the nonscientist. Handy charts, simple wording, and astute observations combine to provide a thought-provoking look at what we're doing to our planet. One of the aspects I like best is that Zalasiewicz isn't afraid to admit what science doesn't know, what is *pure* speculation. He is also unafraid to make logical deductions and clear cases for what he believes is inevitable based on the information at hand.An excellent read!

    17. I thought this book was interesting. It is strange to think of the remenants of our civilization to be nothing but artifacts buried of rock, but that is likely to happen just like other ancient fossils. Hard to put down.

    18. I am sure the planet will be a far happier place after all traces of humankind has been swallowed up once nature starts replenishing itself. The only legacy will be that of greed, destruction and violence. A wonderful read.

    19. I was hoping for a little more. This book is definitely for the lay person who doesn't know much about geology wrapped in a what-if scenario of an alien race discovering human existence in the rocks. I was hoping for a more enjoyable read.

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