Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar

Anno s Mysterious Multiplying Jar Superbly demonstrating the conception of factorials in mathematics the text and pictures combine to present a lesson in a palatable form as well as the pleasure of looking at pictures that only Mitsu

  • Title: Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar
  • Author: Masaichiro Anno Mitsumasa Anno
  • ISBN: 9780698117532
  • Page: 406
  • Format: Paperback
  • Superbly demonstrating the conception of factorials in mathematics, the text and pictures combine to present a lesson in a palatable form as well as the pleasure of looking at pictures that only Mitsumasa Anno could invent Publishers Weekly The book moves logically and elegantly from the concrete to the abstract Once made clear, the concept is unforgettable, but the Superbly demonstrating the conception of factorials in mathematics, the text and pictures combine to present a lesson in a palatable form as well as the pleasure of looking at pictures that only Mitsumasa Anno could invent Publishers Weekly The book moves logically and elegantly from the concrete to the abstract Once made clear, the concept is unforgettable, but the book entices the reader to return for further appreciation of the artistry with which it was designed The Horn Book If you want a book that does a good selling job on the factorial concept, this one works School Library Journal

    • Unlimited [Paranormal Book] ✓ Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar - by Masaichiro Anno Mitsumasa Anno ✓
      406 Masaichiro Anno Mitsumasa Anno
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Paranormal Book] ✓ Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar - by Masaichiro Anno Mitsumasa Anno ✓
      Posted by:Masaichiro Anno Mitsumasa Anno
      Published :2019-06-01T10:19:56+00:00

    1 thought on “Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar”

    1. One key part of the explanation of factorials is missing. It would help so much if the drawings of the dots showed the components of the previous number. That is to say, on the page which shows the representation of "In each village there were six houses. In each house there were seven rooms," the mass of dots on the second page should show, by a thin line or thin white space, each of the six houses. A mass of dots is just too overwhelming for a lot of children.Still, a good companion to How Muc [...]

    2. Why oh why couldn’t math class have been like this in the upper elementary grades. (Well, okay, I did enjoy learning and using the abacus in sixth grade, but overall my math lessons until college were mostly uninspired.)This is a concept book about factorials. The story and facts are enhanced by beautiful and detailed artwork.I actually might have found the story proper a bit confusing, but the afterword manages to make factorials so clear.A father and son team collaborated on this book. I rea [...]

    3. Read this to my Gr. 7 math students. They found it intriguing and entertaining. I just wish the pictures helped show the story a little more clearly.

    4. A picture book about factorials! This story illustrates how numbers multiply by showing objects nested inside each other. We start with one island, and on the island there are two countries, and in each country there are three mountains, and and so on until we finish with ten jars (10!) inside a box in the cupboard of a room in a house in a village within the walls of a kingdom on a mountain in a country on an island. (whew!)After the pictorial story, we learn the mathematical explanation by sub [...]

    5. You know, I'm confused about why this book is considered so good. I used it to work with a group of 5 students. I love math, and I love factorials, and parts of this book are great. Why, why, why on earth does this book blend factorials and surrealism? The fact that it started with a jar that has an ocean inside it is whimsical to an adult, but can be pretty confusing to a kid who is supposed to be learning math. The fact that the final thing to figure out is how many jars. a kid a break!The ill [...]

    6. I think that I'm the wrong target audience for this one. I can think of no way I can use the book successfully with the littles (3-5 year olds), other than to read the first half of the book and then stop all together. I can understand, however, how a classroom actually studying factorials might find the book useful. For me, however, the second half of the book is of little value or interest to me or my students. My kiddos would enjoy the details within the illustrations, though.Originally writt [...]

    7. Title: Anno's Mysterious Multiplying JarAuthor:Masaichiro Anno and Mitsumasa Anno Genre: Concept bookTheme(s): Factorials, mathOpening line/sentence: This story is about one jar and what was inside it. Brief Book summary: In this story, there is a jar filled with water. The water becomes an ocean with an island inside of it. The book then becomes more and more specific describing what is on the island, in the village, etc. Professional Review 1:"Superbly demonstrating the conception of factorial [...]

    8. This is a wonderful book for students working on their multiplication. I would use it for a student who needs a challenge, but I would only allow them to view the equation part and make them answer it before continuing on with the explanation.Extend this by having a student write their own story and equation for classmates to answer. There would be an exchange of equations daily to see if everyone can eventually complete all the problems. TTW make an easy and a hard equation to answer for differ [...]

    9. After reading the book I will ask my students, "How many jars were in the boxes?" Then I will have my student’s pair up and with their partner work to solve the problem. With a partner my students will walk through the book. They will have a box of math manipulatives at their table that they may use to assist them to discover the total amount of jars. Once the students have physically displayed the amount of jars I will have them write a problem to go along with their findings. At the end of t [...]

    10. This is a very interesting story that describes the concept of factorials in a very concrete and understandable way. The book reminds me of David M. Schwartz's book, How Much Is a Million? and it helps to show our girls just how big some numbers are. We really enjoyed reading this book together.

    11. I have already created a lesson revolving around this story. This book is my math workshop mini lesson. This book works perfectly to help students understand the concept of multiplication as groups of objects. After students explore multiplication and explore the concepts by coming up with their own strategies, as a review I will have the class come back together and use manipulatives to solve Anno's mystery. I will supply cut outs of islands kingdoms and jars to help illustrate.

    12. We really enjoyed this story. We had fun playing with the numbers and trying to say 10! without saying 10 factorial. At first the kids thought it was just an adding book but then they realized there was an immense pattern. It reminded and reinforced the factorial concept we read about in the Number Devil. And, as always, Anno's books are beautifully illustrated which adds to the beauty of the pattern of numbers.

    13. A superb illustrated book that talks about multiplication and fractions. It talks about how you can have 2 islands with different countries and so on and so on to get the students thinking. You could have your students come up with their own examples based on the book and have them swap with a partner to have their partner solve their own riddle and factorial.

    14. This was a pretty clever book. I would use it in my fourth and fifth grade classrooms when we are discussing multiplying, and factorials (if they do that). It gives a great visual for factorials and they can even try and do the math themselves before learning about factorials which would be a good warm up before introducing the term.

    15. A pictoral explaination of multiplication and factorials. I really like Anno's illustrations with clean lines and simple everyday objects. The dot diagrams and additional information about factorials at the end of the book are also very helpful.

    16. This picture book is easy to read, and has two math concepts to work with: the first is counting to ten. The second is factorials: If there are three kingdoms in two countries on one island, then how many kingdoms are there altogether? PK-3

    17. The illustrations in this book are very elaborate. The book gives you excellent visuals for how to use !(Factorials). With the use of framed illustrations you can work your way through this book, until you are able to use dots to complete the math.

    18. This is a great book that gives a wonderful explanation of the concept of multiplying visually (for those visual learners). As each page turns, students see math concepts. It is a fun book that includes math lessons for students to actually solve.

    19. This book deals with factorials was given with our math material for class. I think the concept of factorials is a bit confusing and at times I think the book can be too. I do like that they tell the story twice, giving 2 types of visuals for the class, but it is still fuzzy at times.

    20. This is a children's book, but it stretched my mathematical thinking further than it had been stretched in years. My engineer-husband liked it and so did my son. I also love Anno's illustrations. It makes math beautiful. :)

    21. 35 months - I wanted to check this one out and see if it was worth borrowing in a couple years for understanding multiplication. Not bad. The illustrations give visual understanding to a concept that can often seem too abstract to kids.

    22. Awesome book about multiplications and factorials. This book confuses me with the last math problem, however, my 3rd graders loved when I read the huge number to them (3,628,800) about how many jars were in the boxes

    23. This is the easiest way to explain factorials to children. It goes through all of the steps very simply and makes everything clear. Recommend greatly when teaching this.

    24. Long before I studied combinatorics, I had an understanding of factorials and how quickly they grow, simply because of this lovely book.

    25. This just might be my very favorite Anno book. A story about factorials that even the haters should be able to agree is totes "developmentally appropriate"? Sign me up.

    26. Japonsky nádherně ilustrovaná kniha o faktoriálu. Po Kočce v zemi čísel další matematická pohádka, která rozhodně stojí za přečtení!

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