The Mouse that Roared: Disney and the End of Innocence

The Mouse that Roared Disney and the End of Innocence How are children and their parents affected by the world s most influential corporation Giroux explores the surprisingly diverse ways in which Disney strives to dominate global media and shape the des

  • Title: The Mouse that Roared: Disney and the End of Innocence
  • Author: Henry A. Giroux
  • ISBN: 9781442201439
  • Page: 143
  • Format: Paperback
  • How are children and their parents affected by the world s most influential corporation Giroux explores the surprisingly diverse ways in which Disney strives to dominate global media and shape the desires, needs, and futures of today s children.

    • Best Download [Henry A. Giroux] ↠ The Mouse that Roared: Disney and the End of Innocence || [Manga Book] PDF ✓
      143 Henry A. Giroux
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Henry A. Giroux] ↠ The Mouse that Roared: Disney and the End of Innocence || [Manga Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Henry A. Giroux
      Published :2019-03-13T01:00:35+00:00

    1 thought on “The Mouse that Roared: Disney and the End of Innocence”

    1. A while ago I was reading the introduction to some essays by Adorno and the author was talking about Adorno's idea of dual consciousness or double consciousness, something like that. The example used to explain this idea was horoscopes - I suspect that very few of us really 'believe' in horoscopes, but that doesn't stop them being amongst the most popular parts of newspapers and magazines. And even though we that it is probably something of an overstatement that one-in-twelve people in our socie [...]

    2. I liked this book, but it is really soul crushing. I love Disney movies, Pixar movies, and Disneyland, but this book really ruins a lot of it. In a good way, I suppose. Giroux examines Disney as a corporation, as a leader of education, and as a cultural force. Most of it, unsurprisingly, is negative. After all, the Disney corporation is one of the handful that is trying to take over the world. It's almost expected that they exercise shady business practices and fascist control. To me, the most e [...]

    3. (originally published at randoymwords)As someone who is interested in the way people play with corporate-driven mass media, I was looking forward to reading the authors' argument about how Disney affects children's culture. Instead, I ended up having to slog through pages and pages of pedagogy about grass-roots democracy. There actually isn't much in here about Disney media itself. The passages that do cover specific movies and theme parks are very much taken out of context.I suspect that the au [...]

    4. Critical theorist Giroux tackles the Disney conglomerate in considering issues of power and justice. As Giroux explains, Disney, a corporation with the intent of seeking profit, has integrated entertainment and education hand in hand. Taking this step means that they are responsible for the morality, beliefs, and cultural continuation for American children. He calls for a critical examination of Disney's practices in order to understand what the impact of their choices are on America. He does no [...]

    5. I have a great interest in how story telling shapes our culture and sense of self. The introduction to this book says "Mass-produced images fill our daily lives and condition our most intimate perceptions and desires. At issue for parents, educators, and others is how culture, especially media culture, has become a substantial, if not the primary, educational force in regulating the meanings, values and tastes that set the norms that offer up and legitimate particular subject positions-- what it [...]

    6. The debate about children's loss of innocence signifies more than society's changing attitude toward young people; it also points to the rise of a corporate culture that reasserts the primacy of individualism and competitiveness and that calls for young people to surrender their capacity to become citizens in the fullest sense—possessed of the widest range of citizen skills and rights—for a market-based notion of identity, one that suggests relinquishing their roles as critical subjects for [...]

    7. Highly critical examination of all aspects of the Walt Disney Company, from films to planned communities to partisanship to labor to merchandising to its reach into education. Excellent points about the dangers of corporate capitalism and brand loyalty.

    8. ARGH! This book I appreciated the topic, the impact of Disney's stereotypes and illusion of the completely blissful life. Just did not love the delivery. This book is about 17 years old, I would be interested to hear if the author feels has any updated comments on the topic First of all, if you are going to read this book, the most important thing is that you should know what the word "pedagogy" is (because I didn't) - the author uses this word in practically every sentence. "Pedagogy refers to [...]

    9. This book was quite interesting, but I found it hard to keep up as it was written in such dense, academic text. (I am far better suited to reading science-type books of this nature, and not much else. It reads too much like work.) The author covers how Disney, as a giant, multi-faceted, multi-national corporation, exerts great control over what children (and adults) not only consume, but also how and what they learn. The author first shows how Disney World and Disneyland's images of innocence an [...]

    10. Ed.D Reading! I know there is a problem in this country when it comes to mega-corporations, and the fact that 90% of our nation's media is controlled by SIX of these corporations. What we get is NOT what we see when it comes to information and news. HOWEVER, I have no patience for writers that want to make villains of companies that, while protecting their own financial interests, create wonderful spaces and safe creations for children to learn and explore creativity. Yes, there is issue with th [...]

    11. Wow! What a read on the state of our culture, and how much Disney owns of it. Disney's influence ranges from Baby Einstein, to Hannah Montana, and beyond. their business is designed from cardle to grave. As they sell culture to various cultures, ethics chnage. Politics, media, even religion is shaped and influenced by the mouse. Giroux points out the obvious and not so obvious. He does not go for the jugular, by presenting the upsides to Disney and the joy so many gain by it's existence. Still, [...]

    12. "Education is never innocent, because it always presupposes a particular view of citizenship, culture, and society. And yet it is this very appeal to innocence, bleached of any semblance of politics, that has become a defining feature of Disney culture and pedagogy."This book was a real eyeopener to a Disney fan like myself. Giroux comments primarily on Disney as a corporate powerhouse, but the most interesting passages analyzed the thematic (racial, sexist, and anti-democratic) implications of [...]

    13. While giving very valid points about the corporation Disneyland's commercialism, many others were completely off the mark. What I read that the author says is bad about the Disneyland corporation is actually good, in my opinion: emphasis on the importance of the conventional nuclear family, non-traditional education that is fun and includes input form leaders such as Howard Gardner on Multiple Intelligence, wholesome entertainment, patriotism for the American way, successful employee training pr [...]

    14. This is a book about the corruption of the Disney cooperation. I put this in my book set because it talks about a lot of social issues such as image, control over a nation, and hidden identity. I read this my senior year for a research project and feel in love with the double edge sword of identity that Disney Portrays to the public and their company. I loved reading about the dirty under belly of the Disney company and the loss of childhood innocence. Every students should read this book it rea [...]

    15. At the end of the day, Giroux searches every nook and cranny for problematic elements in the Disney Corp and believe me, there's lots to be scared about. However, I do think Giroux goes a little overboard at times with analysis, reading too much into some ideas. But for someone who is looking to become further enlightened in the world of Disney, this is worth checking out - I would recommend Disney Discourse as well.

    16. A thought provoking look at the dangers of corporate growth. It's a good reminder that you always need to keep in mind what's going on behind the curtain and remember that no matter how friendly Disney's public face is, they're still looking out for Disney first. The book is a bit of a tough slog because it's obviously written by academics without a lot of thought to the layperson but there are a lot of important ideas hiding behind the overly complex jargon.

    17. A very interesting book that has been both helpful and useful for my dissertation. Chapters 1, 2 and 5 are very strong - Chapter 3 is a weak and pared down version of Amy Hill's 'Good Girls and Wicked Witches' and the collaborative 'From Mouse to Mermaid' - I would read/cite them over Giroux's essay discussing gender stereotypes in Disney movies from 1989 onwards.

    18. Of all the Disney critic books I've read, this one did the least for me. While the argument that Disney has an almost incomprehensible of power and cultural influence is undeniable, the book has a lackluster and as-if-uninterested voice about the situation. Overall, the book is okay--but it doesn't really bring much to the table.

    19. I haven't got very far and am giving up. I have so many other books to read, and this is just boring. I was hoping for more dish. I had a roommate who was Mickey Mouse/Disney (but mostly Mickey so I HATE that mouse) obsessed so I wanted some dirt. :) It's repetitive already and dull dull dull.

    20. A very easy read on every aspect of just what the Disney organization is doing to the world. It touches on a million different aspect, but doesn't go into depth as much as I would have liked on some of them. It is, however, very insightful and an overall interesting read.

    21. Giroux and Pollack provide a clear argument for the ways that large corporations undermine children's welfare and democracy. Recommended for media scholars who have an interest in the political economy of capitalism as exemplified through Disney.

    22. I, like most Floridians, live in the shadow of Disney World. It sits there, thirty minutes down the road from me, like the evil embodiment of capitalism, greed, and fakery. Reading negative press about Disney always makes me smile cynically.

    23. I'm a Disney fan but wanted to see the other side of the coin. Be aware it's written in the style of an academic essay.

    24. Wow - serious title about Disney as a major business and how it influences business and society. This is the updated and expanded edition reissued in 2010.

    25. Great perspective of Disney and the theme of Illusion. What are you really advocating when you consume Disney products? - Very intriguing!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *